About me

Underwater photography

My home town is Borna, where I was born on the 6th of March 1970. As a nature lover, my main area of interest is underwater photography. This was awakened by my first diving course in 1993 in the Maledives, and quickly turned into the desire to photograph the unique inhabitants of the oceans myself. Using borrowed cameras such as the Nikonos V, off I went on diving trips to many of the underwater paradises of the world . The countries and regions which I have visited so far are Egypt, Australia, Belize, Botswana, Denmark, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Indonesia, La Rèunion, Mauritius, the Maldives, Myanmar, Namibia, Norway, New Zealand, Portugal, Zambia, Sweden, the Seychelles, South Africa, Sudan, Singapore, Spain, Thailand und Tonga.
A trip to Tonga in the South Seas to see and photograph humpback whales fundamentally changed my interest in the underwater world. While I started off fascinated by the beautiful colours of fish and corals, I am now motivated by a deep interest in whales, dolphins and sharks. The experience of diving or swimming with these animals is simply indescribable.

and other subjects

Through my frequent journeys and stop-overs in cities all over the world, I also enjoy a little urban photography. I am particularly fascinated by the great metropolises of Asia. I have never experienced such dynamic societies in Europe, nor the amazing variety of different cultures co-existing successfully at such close quarters.

I would also like to get more involved in fashion and publicity photography – I imagine combining it with underwater photography. I have already made the first steps in this direction.

I only take digital photographs

I found the switch to digital photography very challenging. Administering the enormous amounts of data seems particularly difficult. However, the advantages of digital over analogue outweigh the disadvantages. The market for digital single lens reflex cameras shows how successful the technology has been. Companies in the photography business which missed or postponed the switch to digital through a sense of superiority have now been unlisted by the “Dow Jones” like Kodak, or have declared bankruptcy like Agfa. The steep drop in prices in the digital market is however also dangerous for the successful firms. We can see the same process happening as in personal computers. The market becomes more and more saturated, and customers do not continually need new cameras. This means that there will be more mergers and bankruptcies, or, like IBM, the sale of the entire time-honoured PC business to Lenovo.